A Perfumed Walk in the Corsican Scrub

In the hills around Porto Vecchio, the botanist Stéphane Rogliano leads sensorial walks for nature lovers. Jean-Louis Pierrisnard, director of the Research and Development department at L'Occitane en Provence, recounts his experience.
By Caroline Taret

Stéphane Rogliano introduces himself with a synopsis of his offering, “A journey of discovery of the perfume of the scrub and plant species of the Corsican mountains.” Who wouldn’t want to jump on a plane to Corsica after hearing that opening statement? And Jean-Louis Pierrisnard drives the point home, “to take this aromatic walk led by a perfumer is to plunge for an hour into the Corsican scrub above Porto Vecchio, with an unobstructed view across the Corsican coast.” The décor is 100 percent natural, and one word especially grabs our attention. Perfumer! Indeed, Stéphane Rogliano is a guide specialized in botany and wild plants. A horticulturist by training, and a true storyteller at heart, he shares with passion his love for the fragrances of the Corsican vegetation. “It’s a walk created with intelligence, open to all, which includes a bunch of anecdotes that both novices and experts will enjoy,” adds Jean-Louis, who also warns that it’s hard not be charmed by this character with such a warm and friendly smile.

A refreshing alternative to typical vacation pastimes, the trek goes deep into the Corsican scrub, along a little-used path, in groups of about ten. We pass from one breathtaking landscape to another, absorbing nature’s messages via scent. “Touch, smell, understand this arid environment’s ecosystem, where life grows with little water. It’s a total immersion in the island’s natural heritage.” We see immortelle, lavender, rosemary, sea buckthorn and myrtle, as well as lesser known plants like the blue flowering sedum, villous broom flowers and tree heath. It’s a magical world where each plant contributes to the scrub’s distinctive aroma. Throughout the walk, Stéphane Rogliano shares his fascinating stories, such as how Corsicans use the feminine article when talking about myrtle, whereas the rest of the world prefers the masculine. The Corsican dialect seems to have the upper hand over Latin here… What’s striking is the natural abundance of the vegetation and each plant evolves according to its environment. As a final note, Jean-Louis adds “It’s marvelous to imagine everything we can do. I have the personal conviction that Corsica is a territory to explore further for L’Occitane.

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Walking tour with Stéphane Rogliano
04 95 70 34 64
06 19 89 65 36
Porto-Vecchio – Corsica


A Perfumed Walk in the Corsican Scrub
A perfumed walk in the Corsican Scrub
Corsica
Photography Stéphane Rogliano
A Perfumed Walk in the Corsican Scrub
A perfumed walk in the Corsican Scrub
Corsica
Photography Stéphane Rogliano

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