Alain Passard Recipe: Duck Roasted in Fig Leaves

For Vins de Provence, chef Alain Passard imagined a holiday dinner dedicated to Provence. After a sweet and sour lobster to start, continue with duck.
Alain Passard for Vins de Provence


1 In a hot pan, brown the duck breasts without cooking them. In a cast-iron pan, place a bed of fig leaves in the bottom, lay the duck breasts on top then cover with the rest of the leaves. Moisten with the colza oil and put the lid on the pan. Preheat the oven to 200°C then bake for 20 minutes (adapt cooking time to your taste).

2 While the duck is cooking, peel the celeriac, cut in quarters and cook with the butter and half a glass of water over a low heat until the liquid has completely evaporated. Slice fine quarters of red cabbage and glaze in the same way.

3 Remove the duck from the oven and leave to rest in the pan for 15 min then cut into slices. Serve surrounded by the glazed cabbage and celeriac. Recuperate the cooking juice and drizzle over everything. Finish the seasoning with sea salt, a dash of soy sauce and freshly ground pepper.

Serves 4 - Preparation time: 15 min Cooking time: 25 min Resting time: 15 min

4 good-sized duck breasts, on the bone (ask your butcher)
20 fig leaves
1 medium celeriac
1 small red cabbage
30 ml colza oil
10 ml soy sauce
60 gr of salted butter
1 stalk of rosemary

Red Wines - Côtes de Provence

In the shadow of the rosés, Côtes de Provence reds are too often overlooked. This is a real shame since Provence terroirs produce red wines that can be aged. These wines associate character and elegance. They have the temperament of warm southern wines, full-bodied but tinged with a certain softness that recalls volume, roundness. With the great vintages, mature tannins harmonize with the alcohol and the acidity giving these balanced red wines much aromatic complexity. These wines have a long finish and leave an impression of silky sweetness.

They should be served at 16-18°C.

Suggestions from Nathalie Pouzalgues, oenologist at the Rosé Research Centre (Centre de Recherche et d'Expérimentation sur le Vin Rosé):

1. CHÂTEAU COUSSIN 2007, Cuvée César. Grape varieties: 85% Syrah, 10% Grenache, 5% Cabernet-Sauvignon

2. DOMAINE DE RIMAURESQ 2007, Cuvée Quintessence du R. Grape varieties: 85% Mourvèdre, 15% Syrah

3. MAS DE CADENET 2004, Cuvée Mas Négrel Cadenet. Grape varieties: 45% Grenache, 45% Syrah, 10% Cabernet-Sauvignon

4. DOMAINE GAVOTY 1999, Cuvée Clarendon. Grape varieties: 80% Syrah, 20% Cabernet

Vins de Provence
L'Arpège, Alain Passard 's restaurant
Duck roasted in fig leaves
Duck roasted in fig leaves
Recipe Alain Passard for Vins de Provence
Photography Vins de Provence

Latest articles

Turn Back the Clock in Style

Turn Back the Clock in Style

Between a decrease in light and upset habits, the switch to winter time is often synonymous with a disruption of your daily rhythm. Let’s look at the right routine to adopt to make the most of this autumn ritual.
L’Immortelle, The Sunshine of the Corsican Maquis

L’Immortelle, The Sunshine of the Corsican Maquis

The floral emblem of Corsica, the Immortelle flower is one of L'Occitane’s favorite ingredients. This enduring affection is transcribed through a new exhibition about the famous "golden sun."
Three Historical Facts You Might Not Know About Provence

Three Historical Facts You Might Not Know About Provence

Here L'Occitane shares some anecdotes with you surrounding Provence. Let’s look at a few highlights that have marked the history of the region over the centuries.